Two Architects investigate the Evolution of #OWS Two Architects investigate the Evolution of #OWS 1 – ArchDaily

Two Architects investigate the Evolution of #OWS Two Architects investigate the Evolution of #OWS 1 – ArchDaily.

Complex timeline / infographic about Occupy Wallstreet; blends data streams like occupation timeline, key events, arrests, online activity, and temperature (a nod to Charles Joseph Minard’s famous info graphic about Napoleon’s march to Moscow?).

Thanks Dane!

Edward Tufte: Posters and Graph Paper

Edward Tufte: Posters and Graph Paper.

This link does double-duty.  If you are interested in learning more about information graphics, information architecture, data displays, etc., you will need to read the work of Edward Tufte.  He has long been a champion of Charles Joseph Minard’s work, and calls it “the best statistical graphic ever drawn.”  Analyzed through McCloud’s language, Minard’s graphic is brilliant because it shows us something close to moment to moment progression towards and back from Moscow, but it also gives us aspect to aspect information: size of the army, temperature, date–all things happening at the same time.

CABINET // A Timeline of Timelines

CABINET // A Timeline of Timelines.

What could be better for this class and the first assignment than a timeline of timelines?  Although this web page isn’t highly visual, be sure to check out the poster version of the information to see the power of communicating the same information more visually.  Notice that Minard’s infographic about Napoleon’s march to Moscow is here, as are other items we have seen.  The 1950 timeline of an atomic bomb explosion is an excellent example of a really small scale timeline: millisecond changes.

Timeline: A Look Back at 40 Years of Atari | GeekDad | Wired.com

Timeline: A Look Back at 40 Years of Atari | GeekDad | Wired.com.

Wired produces a lot of timelines / information graphics about video games, and they pretty consistently try to capture the visual look and feel of the game–its fonts and colors.  They also mess with the notion of “line.” Note that some elements in this infographic don’t even fall on the line–how will McCloud help us understand that?